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4 edition of Economic and social implications of sugar cane processing in developing countries found in the catalog.

Economic and social implications of sugar cane processing in developing countries

A. C. Hannah

Economic and social implications of sugar cane processing in developing countries

by A. C. Hannah

  • 290 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by International Labour Office in Geneva .
Written in

    Places:
  • Developing countries.
    • Subjects:
    • Sugar workers -- Developing countries.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 88-89).

      Statementby A.C. Hannah.
      SeriesWorking papers / Sectoral Activities Programme ;, SAP 2.8/WP.17, Working papers (International Labour Organisation. Sectoral Activities Programme) ;, SAP 2.8/WP.17.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD8039.S85 D444 1989
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 102 p. ;
      Number of Pages102
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1627202M
      ISBN 109221070239
      LC Control Number91174437
      OCLC/WorldCa24467537

      The potential impact of GMOs to grow or limit economic value in trade markets is an important consideration for some developing countries. For African nations in . Cuba - Cuba - Sugarcane and the growth of slavery: During the 18th century Cuba depended increasingly on the sugarcane crop and on the expansive, slave-based plantations that produced it. In the Havana Company was formed to stimulate agricultural development by increasing slave imports and regulating agricultural exports. The company was unsuccessful, selling fewer slaves in 21 .

      Queensland has 20% of Australia’s sugar cane production, but crops were damaged and lost a vast amount of money. Related to agriculture, there was a loss of at least $ million. There was an effect on tourism, Yasi made landfall between the cities of Innisfail ad Cardwell which lie near the famous touring spot; Great Barrier Reef. The sugar industry in South Africa has been reported as an industry with a high socio-economic developmental focus in rural areas by organising resources, creating job opportunities, providing a source of income and developing transport and communication networks [].However, Garside and Bell [] state that although there are benefits obtainable from sugarcane production, the sugar industry has.

        Sugar is almost completely extracted from two crops – sugar cane and sugar beet. Some billion metric tons of sugar cane were produced worldwide in , of .   There was a large increase in sugarcane production in the country to replace fossil fuels with biofuels, in addition to meeting the demand for sugar 2, 3. This new scenario boosted the development of new production regions in the state of São Paulo and in the Northeast region, and expanded production to Paraná, Goiás, Mato Grosso, and Mato.


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Economic and social implications of sugar cane processing in developing countries by A. C. Hannah Download PDF EPUB FB2

Only 20 countries produce oil, but more than cultivate sugarcane. Expanding production of clean, renewable sugarcane products would help enhance energy security and reduce global dependence on fossil fuels.

Economic Growth. These cane-growing nations are located in the tropics and are often developing countries that need economic. Critique of selected peer-reviewed publications on applied social life cycle assessment Focus on cases from developing countries.

cane and sugar production cannot be assessed due to. Social and environmental impacts of sugarcane production in Brazil. 18 November Report. In this publication, data and recent analyses will be presented on the expansion of sugar cane monoculture for ethanol production in Brazil, and in particular on the monopolisation in the sector due to mergers and the takeover of production plants by.

the sugar takes place in the importing countries. Introduction Sugar cane (Saccharum spp.) is a perennial grass and one of the few plants which stores its carbohydrate reserves as sucrose.

Its economic value lies in the stalks, and the sugar/sucrose they contain after crushing. Sugar cane supplies more than half of the world’s sugar File Size: KB. sugarcane monoculture is the constant rise in the world’s demand for sugar. Sugarcane accounts for 80% of the amount of sugar produced worldwide.

However, industrialization has led to more investments in sugarcane farming for production of clean fuels, namely; ethanol and biogas. Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is an important crop for sugar and bioenergy worldwide.

The increasing greenhouse gas emission and global warming during climate change result in the increased frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. Climate change is expected to have important consequences for sugarcane production in the world, especially in the developing countries.

Abstract: Assessing the choice of technology for small scale sugar production, and its economic and social viability, Cane Sugar will interest those responsible for sugar development, industry decision makers, non-governmental organizations, and appropriate technology organizations.

Proceeding of a joint ITDG/IDS conference, September 15/12/ Through an analysis of the agronomy, land suitability and industrial processing of sugar cane and its co-products, along with an assessment of the energy, economic and environmental implications, this volume demonstrates that sugar cane offers a competitive and environmentally beneficial resource for Africa's economic development and energy.

development in balance with social and environmental values. Thus, the first step to expand this sector would be to identify the social and environmental impacts of the sugarcane industry.

Public policies are also acting on the sector and have a prominent role in the scenario. Key-words: Sugarcane industry. Social. Hugot. Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam, xx + pp. ISBN Price: $/Dfl These two volumes, The energy cane alternative and The handbook of cane sugar engineering, are numbers 6 and 7 in Elsevier's sugar series.

Together they cover the complete range of sugar cane growing, harvesting and processing. Key words: Sugar Cane, Sugar Cane Productivity, Sugar Production, Economic Challenges INTRODUCTION Sugar cane is a subtropical and tropical crop which needs lots of sun provided that its roots are not water-logged (Zimbabwe Sugar Association, ).

According to a research carried out by Sserunkuma and Kiniera() countries worldwide. Sweet and sour: The impact of sugar production and consumption on people and the environment () Report Summary.

Production. Sugar is unique as a world agricultural commodity, with two different crops competing for the same market: cane (produced mainly in poor tropical countries) and beet (produced mainly in wealthy temperate countries).

Around percent is produced from sugar cane with the remainder from sugar beet. The cultivation and processing of sugar produce environmental impacts through the loss of natural habitats, intensive use of water, heavy use of agro-chemicals, discharge and runoff of polluted effluent and air pollution.

These small economies rely on agricultural production (e.g. sugar cane), fishing, and tourism. The island nations, however, lack natural resources and.

To further emphasize the relative weightings and importance of sugar to developing countries it might be added that 70 percent of world sugar output is produced in developing countries and 85 percent of cane sugar.

Similarly, developing countries account for 65 percent of total world sugar exports by volume, including 80 percent of cane sugar.

The analysis was designed to achieve three goals: (1) identifying a list of relevant social topics and finding the factors influencing the social topics along the supply chain of sugarcane-to-sugar factory, (2) examining the profiles of workforce for sugarcane production (labor use and working hours), and (3) comparing the influence of.

Sugarcane or sugar cane refer to several species and hybrids of tall perennial grasses in the genus Saccharum, tribe Andropogoneae, that are used for sugar plants are two to six metres (six to twenty feet) tall with stout, jointed, fibrous stalks that are rich in sucrose, which accumulates in the stalk anes belong to the grass family Poaceae, an economically.

Most U.S. sugar imports are raw cane sugar. The raw cane sugar TRQ is allocated to 40 countries based on patterns established during the relatively unrestricted free trade period of The Dominican Republic, Brazil, and the Philippines hold the largest shares--approximat 14, and 13 percent, respectively.

Sugar is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. Table sugar, granulated sugar, or regular sugar, refers to sucrose, a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose.

Simple sugars, also called monosaccharides, include glucose, fructose, and nd sugars, also called disaccharides or double sugars, are molecules composed of.

John M. Manners, in Advances in Botanical Research, Abstract. Sugarcane is an established source of sugar and is the current benchmark first-generation feedstock for efficient biofuel production.

Sugarcane improvement has traditionally focused on sucrose-yield traits. In the future, energycanes with higher yields of fermentable sugars and fibre (bagasse) for biofuel and electricity.

Overall, the economic, environmental, and social implications of utilizing cane trash in the final crop year as a substitute for bunker oil appears promising.

It represents an opportunity for developing biomass energy use in the Sugarcane industry as well as for industries /. When we last left off looking at sugarcane's spread from India/Indonesia to the rest of the world, the sugar industry had shifted from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic islands of Spain and Portugal, including Madeira and the Canary islands.

During this time, the powers in Europe were developing a taste for sugar.Global sugar cane producing countries (NETAFIM, Israel). Zambia and Tanzania (Richardson, 5). Even though the average yield per ha in Africa is as low as about 85% of that of the world, poor countries in Southern Africa are still experiencing something of a boom in sugar cane production (Tarimo and Takamura, ).